At HubSpot, we’ve built our marketing team from two business school graduates working from a coffee table to a powerhouse of over 200 employees. Along the way, we’ve learned countless lessons that’ve shaped our current content marketing strategy, so we decided to illustrate our insights in a blog post to teach marketers how to develop a successful content marketing strategy, regardless of their team’s size.
If you do decide that building an agency is what you want to do, create an LLC or SCorp. This will grant you personal legal security if something goes terribly wrong (lawsuits). It also allows you a multitude of tax benefits. I would suggest getting an LLC or SCorp established as soon as possible as it also legitimizes your business in both the eyes of the client and Uncle Sam.
For instance, if you are the owner of a hair salon, you may choose to search the term “sulfate-free,” which is a trending topic in the beauty world. For those of you who are in the beginning stages of search and email marketing keyword research, the most useful pieces of information are the number of times the term has been used and who has been using it.

Firms that are successful in marketing invariably start with a marketing plan. Large companies have plans with hundreds of pages; small companies can get by with a half-dozen sheets. Put your marketing plan in a three-ring binder. Refer to it at least quarterly, but better yet monthly. Leave a tab for putting in monthly reports on sales/manufacturing; this will allow you to track performance as you follow the plan.
Irving, TX-based MultiView is a digital marketing agency that specializes in building B2B digital publishing solutions. Since its founding in 2000, the company has grown to a large operation with more than 500 employees between their headquarters and offices in Lehi, UT and Ontario, Canada. Multiview provides digital strategy, social media marketing, and other digital marketing services for their clients. 

By using the sheets you will be able to easily track, monitor, scan, organize, review, and rearrange your tasks without leaving anything behind! (The perks of having a master procrastinator prepare these worksheets is that everything has been considered, even writer’s block. On the downside, we published the worksheets mid-December, so…yeah. That’s on me, too.)
There can be considerable benefit in comparing these figures with those achieved by other organizations (especially those in the same industry); using, for instance, the figures which can be obtained (in the UK) from `The Centre for Interfirm Comparison'. The most sophisticated use of this approach, however, is typically by those making use of PIMS (Profit Impact of Management Strategies), initiated by the General Electric Company and then developed by Harvard Business School, but now run by the Strategic Planning Institute.
Absolute Digital Media provided performance marketing services to a travel firm. The main task on the project was SEO, which was performed using backlinking and optimized content strategy to boost site rankings. Absolute Digital provides monthly site performance audits, performance consulting and other solutions. The client's web presence has considerably increased. 
The distribution plan explains how you’ll deliver your product or service. If you’re offering online software, your product could be distributed through your website. If you’re running a local clothes shop, you distribute your products through your shop. So you see, the distribution channel needs to be aligned with your product. Hence, you need to answer the following questions:
If your marketing plan from last year doesn’t really distinguish from this year’s plan, the first option is definitely a possible route. Is this your first year, or is it difficult to compare your new plan with last year’s plan? Go with option two. It’s more effort, but it will ensure that you’re creating a reliable forecast. This projection allows you to calculate a potential ROI, and gives you a reason to pursue your plan.
Jacob Zimmerem suggested that the definition should cover three dimensions: "customer groups" to be served, "customer needs" to be served, and "technologies" to be used.[6] Thus, the definition of IBM's "corporate mission" in the 1940s might well have been: "We are in the business of handling accounting information [customer need] for the larger US organizations [customer group] by means of punched cards [technology]."
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