When learning an instrument like guitar it is essential to have close ups of the fingers, along with slow playing that way you can see where your fingers go. It's annoying to no end when a site zooms out to show the instructor jamming, not letting me know what their fingers are doing! Fortunately, GuitarTricks is not guilty of this too often, they slip up a few times but make up for it by adding tabs on the side so you know what you are missing.
The ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System is designed to help you learn to make chords as you learn to play guitar.  The ChordBuddy attaches to the neck of electric or acoustic guitars and guides you through learning basic chord fingering positions.  It works in the key of G and makes the G, C, D, and Em chords.  The included instruction book, songbook, DVD, and two-month lesson plan guides you until you learn to make the chords on your own and you’re ready to remove the “training wheels”.  The ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System is $59.99 at Sharper Image.
Many beginning guitarists ask the same question: which are the best guitar brands? Is there a particular brand that outshines the others? Finding the best guitar really comes down to your interests and determining the type of music you want to learn. Although the material you’ll learn for electric, classical, and acoustic is very similar up front, certain guitars are more appropriate for specific genres of music. In this article, we’ll dive into several top guitar brands to help you
Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
I purchased a 1 year sub to JAMPLAY on Christmas day, I’ve known about it for years but what brought me around was their Christmas promotion. $99 for an entire year. I figured this was too good to pass up. PLUS, by the end of my subscription it should be holiday season again and perhaps I will get that great discount again. Not sure if it’s for new subscribers only or not but at any rate, I plan to utilize this site to the absolute fullest because there are things I have wanted to learn my entire life, but wasn’t willing to pay the enormous amount of money to learn it, with JAMPLAY I finally have that opportunity.
If you can't make the chord change from A to E in time with me, don't worry about it. Just leave the chord a little early so that we arrive together on the next chord - this also applies to all the other strum alongs in the course, and even when you are playing by yourself and counting out loud (which you should always do when learning and practicing).
Today we are going to review, starting with the D and A chords. We'll start with some simple down strums to help develop that muscle memory in our fingering hand. Then, we'll move to some down-up strums as well. By spending more time on the basics now, you'll make much faster progress. Keep that first finger down for both chords, it doesn't need to move.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
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