A restaurant chain hired Imagine Media Consulting for their social media marketing services. Imagine Media Consulting managed the client's social media posting schedule and their e-blast programs. The restaurant chain's social media followers and engagement increased due to Imagine Media Consulting's work. The client felt that their team was easy to work with and appreciated their sense of humor.

For instance, as soon as someone signs up on our platform, they get an email welcoming them to our service. A few minutes later they get an email describing what they can do on the platform and they are invited to book a live demo with one of our representatives. Then, they are shown examples of other users and how they achieved their goals (case studies), and so on.
How are you getting it in front of people? I'd send a pair to influencers, artists, and sport stars. I'd also do an awesome job with my branding. The shoe box would be super cool. Shoelaces would be different colors and even some sparkly tissue paper instead of the newspaper colored tissue paper you usually see stuck in the shoes at department stores. My aim would be to make everyone feel like flying superstars.
After both parties have agreed on the same number and general selling terms, you and the buyer will jump into the specifics of the sale. This process will vary from buyer to buyer, but it will involve discussing your payment options and how you should address the transition for employees and clients. At the end of this step, you and the buyer will collaborate to create a legal document—usually called a “term sheet”—that communicates the full details of the sale. Once both parties sign off on this document, the sale is officially complete. Congrats!
A real estate startup hired Brolik for assistance with branding and digital marketing. After a discovery phase, Brolik helped the client hone their target audience and provided website copy, web design, and social media strategy. The client appreciated Brolik's ability to understand and enhance their brand by developing thoughtful audience personas.
Thanks for the great article, I am just confused about your "dog training" example. The topics list you suggest does not include any local qualifiers. I think dog training is a mostly local business. If every dog training school in every city writes those kinds of articles there will be quite a few. :-) I am wondering how to take those great topics plus incorporate the location in a meaningfull way. Do you have any ideas for that? Having the best ranking article about puppy training might not give you more more local customers, or did I miss something ?
If you are extremely savvy with taxes then by all means do them yourself. However for the common person, there are so many nuances to running your own business that it makes sense to push this responsibility onto an expert (like your clients are doing with you!). You can save a lot of money by having a professional file your taxes on a quarterly basis, helping you along the way with write-offs.
I was fortunate to start my career on the marketing team at WordStream, where I was able to develop my paid acquisition skills. What might be unclear to those who have never been on a marketing team specifically is how much actually goes into it. Aside from the pressure to produce, you have to learn complex systems, and if the team is small you have to develop a variety of skills to get even the simplest campaigns off the ground.

When you’re just starting out this may not be the best option as you will want to grow your network, but over time you will realize that having larger clients is far more beneficial to you for a number of reasons. The downside is if you decide to conduct business fully on a percentage of spend model because there are many internal factors within businesses that are going to dictate budget. Some of these factors are within your control (results) but many others are not (internal decisions, seasonality, other costs). You don’t want to get into a situation where your client is spending a very small amount per month and you are only getting 10% of that with the expectation of being on calls and putting the time into it.
I like to use Open Site Explorer as a way to check out what my competitors are doing with their SEO. Moz allows you to find out what external links your competitors are getting. This can give you incredibly valuable insight as to what their content strategy is like, or if they even have one in the first place, and potentially where they’re advertising online.
Your marketing department might encompass digital marketing, print advertisement, ppc management, website optimization, visual identity/branding, event marketing, etc. As a digital marketing agency, this marketing plan discussion will focus mostly on the digital marketing aspect, but the strategies and concepts in this post can be expanded to encompass your entire marketing department. For today’s marketers, creating an integrated marketing plan that includes social media marketing, content marketing, email marketing and SEO — all tenets of a strong digital marketing, or inbound marketing strategy — is necessary in order to attract and convert buyers in a digital age.
Firms often grow complacent because they get lots of traffic from branded keywords such as “acme widget company.” However, branded keyword traffic is a given; google and other search engines will almost always give high rankings to company web pages when a company’s name is part of the search term. What really counts is how much traffic is generated from non-branded keywords — search terms people use when they’re looking for your stuff, but don’t know who you are, or don’t know you sell it. Increasing your share of non-branded keywords is the way to outperform the competition.
Keyword strategies involve identifying the right keywords to focus on, and then using those keywords (and variations of them) in your website content, ppc ads, ppc landing pages, and social media content. While many firms falter before they start by forgetting to identify these terms, many more fail even though they have done their keyword due diligence. why? -- because they fall into keyword traps. Here are six of the most common:
An upscale shopping center and hotel development in San Francisco used Crowd to develop a marketing strategy for leasing units and attracting specific kinds of tenants. The development firm behind the complex employed the whole array of Crowd's services, including web design, physical advertisements and signage, and social media presence. The development has since confirmed several high profile individuals will be bringing restaurants and storefronts to the location when it opens.
Firms that are successful in marketing invariably start with a marketing plan. Large companies have plans with hundreds of pages; small companies can get by with a half-dozen sheets. Put your marketing plan in a three-ring binder. Refer to it at least quarterly, but better yet monthly. Leave a tab for putting in monthly reports on sales/manufacturing; this will allow you to track performance as you follow the plan.
Changes in the environment mean that the forecasts often have to be changed. Along with these, the related plans may well also need to be changed. Continuous monitoring of performance, against predetermined targets, represents a most important aspect of this. However, perhaps even more important is the enforced discipline of a regular formal review. Again, as with forecasts, in many cases the best (most realistic) planning cycle will revolve around a quarterly review. Best of all, at least in terms of the quantifiable aspects of the plans, if not the wealth of backing detail, is probably a quarterly rolling review — planning one full year ahead each new quarter. Of course, this does absorb more planning resource; but it also ensures that the plans embody the latest information, and — with attention focused on them so regularly — forces both the plans and their implementation to be realistic.
×